Blue Flower

FCE Listening Test 6 Part 3

Part 3

You will hear five different people talking about the sport of hill walking. For questions 19-23, choose from the list (A - Fthe reason why each person took up the sport. Use the letters only once. There is one extra letter which you do not need to use.

 

A   Other sports had failed to improve my fitness.

 

B   I had plans to do some serious climbing later on.

 

C  My ambition was to lead hill-walking groups.

 

D   I was hoping it would solve a health problem I had.

 

E   I wanted to be able to enjoy hill walking with other people.

 

F   I realised it would be more fun than other sporting activities.

19 Speaker 1 ______

 

20 Speaker 2 ______

 

21 Speaker 3 ______

 

22 Speaker 4 ______

 

23 Speaker 5 ______

 

 

 





tapescript

 

 19 20 21 22 B 23 D

You will hear five different people talking about the sport of hill walking. For questions 19-23, choose from the list (A - Fthe reason why each person took up the sport. Use the letters only once. There is one extra letter which you do not need to use.

Speaker 1

I was very unfit but determined to do some hill walking. The first time I went though, my companions almost gave up on me. They had to keep stopping while I caught my breath or rested aching muscles - not surprising, really, as I'd never been one for sports or trips to the gym. So the walk was no fun for them, even less so for me. But as I couldn't face the thought of going alone, I knew I had to get myself fit enough to be accepted as a full member of the group. I decided hill walking would be my road to fitness, and by persevering, I got there.

Speaker 2

I'm a very fit person because I've been going to the gym and doing different sports for years. The problem was that, being a very competitive person, I found it difficult to really relax. After reading interviews with hill walkers, I was convinced that this sport would give me a sense of achievement without the pressure: that it was something I'd actually enjoy doing. It wasn't easy knowing where to start, though. Fortunately, I met an experienced walker who'd climbed the highest hills in Scotland. He gave me some tips, and then I just went for it, on my own, because I don't believe in walking in groups. 

Speaker 3

For me, hill walking's been a real challenge. When I first started, I often wanted to turn back when I was only halfway up a hill. I would ask myself: 'Why am I doing this?' But I knew the answer really. I'd failed spectacularly when I'd tried.to get fit playing tennis or swimming, maybe because I wasn't making enough of an effort, but I couldn't see the point. With hill walking, I could feel it was strengthening my legs and the aerobic exercise was just wonderful. An unexpected bonus was making so many friends because you immediately have something in common with people you meet on the hill.

Speaker 4

I used to have a personal trainer, who believed conventional fitness tests were rubbish. He always said: 'All you need to know is how fit you feel now, and how fit you need to be to achieve your own goals.' He trained me in the gym, which improved my muscle tone and my strength in general, but my goal was to one day climb Kilimanjaro, which is at a really high altitude. But to have a chance of reaching the summit, I clearly needed to make a start by climbing some smaller hills! My trainer said I shouldn't give up the gym, but you can't do everything, can you?

Speaker 5

I quite enjoy the hills these days, though it's still a real physical effort, but I think that's the case for lots of people. When I get to the top, though, I'm totally buzzing with what I've achieved. I played football regularly until I was twenty, then I discovered there was something wrong with one of my knees, and I was advised to try hill walking, which was supposed to strengthen it. I liked it so much that I've never looked back, though my knee is absolutely fine now. I'm now trying to organise a hill-walking group because the sport's so much more fun when you can share it.